I’ve been jogging for 5 weeks already and it’s week end tomorrow, it means it’s time to jog and exercise again.  But unfortunately, last Sunday when I’ve noticed that every step was a little different and I was feeling achy.  Right after the cooling down, stretches and breakfast, I’ve immediately checked my ankle and discovered that it was a little swollen.

Since, I am really cautious and wouldn’t want to screw things up; I visited the doctor the next day and was diagnosed with tendonitis.  Well, it isn’t serious but I have to stop jogging for now and do walking instead.  Besides, jogging and walking requires and burns the same amount of calories.  Perhaps, what I’d miss is the feeling of gasping for air when I run.

So for the next few weeks the following are the things that I’d do before and after jogging.  I’d apply hot and cold compress will check out for running shoes and will buy ankle support too. 

Anyway, I’m also posting a little information regarding Tendonitis lifted from this website Hope this helps!

 

tendonitis

 

What is tendonitis?
Sometimes the tendons become inflamed for a variety of reasons, and the action of pulling the muscle becomes irritating. If the normal smooth gliding motion of your tendon is impaired, the tendon will become inflamed and movement will become painful. This is called tendonitis, and literally means inflammation of the tendon.

What causes tendonitis?
The most common cause of tendonitis is overuse. Commonly, individuals begin an exercise program, or increase their level of exercise, and begin to experience symptoms of tendonitis. The tendon is unaccustomed to the new level of demand, and this overuse will cause an inflammation and tendonitis.

Another common cause of symptoms of tendonitis is due to age-related changes of the tendon. As people age, the tendons loose their elasticity and ability to glide as smoothly as they used to. With increasing age, individuals are more prone to developing symptoms of tendonitis. The cause of these age-related changes is not entirely understood, but may be due to changes in the blood vessels that supply nutrition to the tendons.

Sometimes, there is an anatomical cause for tendonitis. If the tendon does not have a smooth path to glide along, it will be more likely to become irritated and inflamed. In these unusual situations, surgical treatment may be necessary to realign the tendon.

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Over a year ago when I’ve started blogging I planned to post pictures of sunrise to officially signify the start of my writing endeavor but I failed since I was having a hard time waking up in the morning.

Then lately I started to focus on jogging ang running since I really wanted to run a marathon and for me to do that being an obsessive compulsive person I tried doing my ‘on-my-own’ training program with the help of some internet research of course.

I took the opportunity that we live almost 200 meters away from the beach and seeing the beach will be a good motivation for me.  I am even considering doing a triathlon if my health permits me to do so later on.

This week end was my 4th training week and I can’t believe that I have been doing this for a month.  Actually, I have noticed improvement in my jogging skills already.  Before I’d easily feel a little panting after 30 seconds of running today I can go for a 45 to 60 seconds without gasping for too much air.  Another achievement is I have also developed an appetite.  Jogging tires me a lot and sipping coffee and eating a heavy breakfast is such a consolation.  And I’m counting on more improvements in the coming days.  I’ll keep you posted on the developments, of course!

Then this Saturday, after I have added a new route last week, I have discovered the opportunity to take pictures of the sunrise.  And I have decided to capture it and of course, it’d be a silly concept if I wouldn’t share it with you.

So, here are some of the pictures that I’ve taken yesterday so you’d have an idea why I find jogging a very worthwhile activity and why I am so looking forward to it lately.  By the way, I’d like to thank the God of Sun for not letting it rain the whole week end morning!

 

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I never really expected that running will be something that I’d truly enjoy! 

I am not a well disciplined person, too.  Well, I do get up early in the morning on week days because of work.  But the week ends is the only time I try to compensate the whole week’s stress. 

And lately, for the last three weeks I’ve found myself waking up at around 5 in the morning regardless of what time I’ve slept the night before.  Plus, I do actually look forward to week ends not only because of the rest but because it’s the time where I can jog with my parents.

So I got myself thinking last Sunday if the exercise before and after run that I am doing is the prescribed or proper way of doing it.  (FYI, I really find my jog a little awkward and silly.  If you are a FRIENDS fan imagine the episode where Phoebe and Rachel run together, I look like a little like Phoebe minus the hands.  Maybe, I’m just exaggerating or something but I really find myself silly.  But what the heck, that wouldn’t stop from running)

Anyway, I’d just like to share this post from the web where I got all the ideas on the proper way of warming up and cooling down.  Click here for the link.

By the way, tomorrow I’ll try to bring my camera when I jog so I can also share the beautiful sunrise in the morning in our local province of Cavite.  Happy reading!

 

All of your runs should start with a warm-up and end with a cool down. Why are they so important? A good warm-up dilates your blood vessels, ensuring that your muscles are well supplied with oxygen. It also raises your muscles’ temperature for optimal flexibility and efficiency. By slowly raising your heart rate, the warm-up also helps minimize stress on your heart when you start your run.

Just as critical, the cool down keeps the blood flowing throughout the body. Stopping suddenly can cause light-headedness because your heart rate and blood pressure drop rapidly. Winding down slowly allows them to fall gradually.

Difficulty: Easy

Time Required: 5-10 minutes for warm-up; 5-10 minutes for cool down

 

Here’s How:

It’s not a good idea to stretch cold muscles, so don’t start with stretching. Do about 5-10 minutes of light aerobic exercise to loosen up your muscles and warm you up for your run. Try walking briskly, jogging slowly, or cycling on a stationary bike. Make sure you don’t rush your warm-up.

Begin your run. Don’t start out racing, but instead jog slowly and gradually build up your speed.

After you finish your run, cool down by walking or slowly jogging for 5 to 10 minutes.

Stretch fully after your cool down. Your body should be warm and stretching should be easy.

Stretch your lower back, neck, calves, quadriceps, hamstrings and groin area. Hold each stretch for 15 to 30 seconds.

Tips:

Never bounce while stretching. Hold still on each stretch for 15 to 30 seconds.

Perform each stretch one to three times.

A stretch should never feel like you’re hurting yourself. If it hurts, stop that stretch immediately.

I never thought that planning to run for a marathon will be this hard. 

First, you have to wake up early in the morning and sleep early so you’ll get a good rest and be properly energized for the morning jog/run.  Second, I’m really lazy doing the proper before and after stretching procedures.  Lastly, based from the program that I am following the only easy part of it is the 5 minutes walk and everything from the alternate 60-second jog and 90-second walk for 20 to 30 minutes isn’t making my legs have the time of its life.

But I know these are just birth pains, and eventually as the program says that in 6 weeks time I can run the marathon and be ready like a true sports enthusiast.

Plus, this endeavor is a nice way for me to bond with my parents.  Both of them walk a couple of meters every morning so I’ve decided that it is perfect opportunity for me to pursue this activity.

Aside from that benefit, it is also good for my health.  Though, being fit isn’t really my priority but unfortunately my cholesterol level says that I should be on strict low fat diet and I don’t want to do this when it’s already too late.

Anyway, there a lot of ways to make running fun and one of these is to have your music play list that will perk you up and get your bones off the field.  Well my play list is a combination of Duncan Sheik and Kelly Clarkson songs.  I love to run with strong vocals and up beat tempo.  

And as of the moment the top on my list is Kelly Clarkson’s I do not Hook Up so I’m sharing the link of its video and maybe if you’ll run or you’re running already this song can be a part of your own play list, too.  Haha!

 

running-marathon

 

I have always imagined myself running the marathon and finishing the race first.  Yes, you’ve read it right since I was little I have wanted to prove everyone that even if I am thin and I look like sickly that I can be the first to cross the finish line.

But unfortunately, I am 30 years old to date and I have not run a single marathon.  There were a lot of times that I get invited by friends’ friend but since I don’t have a friend who’s really into it I haven’t tried it for myself.  I am just the type who wouldn’t venture into something new without a companion.  Yeah, I’m a little dependent in that way.

Plus, I know that before running an actual marathon I should be well prepared.  So, finally I’ve decided last Friday since it is a holiday, I’d start waking up early and try to do some jogging for start.

And thru updating my facebook status, a friend Kymme told me that there are training programs available from the internet. And I’ve found this online, click here.

It is a beginner’s running schedule and it promises to get the runner’s butt head off from the couch onto the roads in just three months.  It is just a few minutes each week and each session should take about 20 or 30 minutes.  Perfect for my schedule because I plan to do this every week ends only.

And for those who would like to do this, just visit the link above and remember this.  Before setting out, make sure to precede each session with a five-minute warm-up walk or jog. Be sure to stretch both before and after.

The program schedule below will be the guide that I’ll be using in the coming weeks.  I’m excited to do this and have a happy running week ends!

 

Week

 Workout 1

 Workout 2

 Workout 3

1

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk. Then alternate 60 seconds of jogging and 90 seconds of walking for a total of 20 minutes. Brisk five-minute warm-up walk. Then alternate 60 seconds of jogging and 90 seconds of walking for a total of 20 minutes. Brisk five-minute warm-up walk. Then alternate 60 seconds of jogging and 90 seconds of walking for a total of 20 minutes.

2

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk. Then alternate 90 seconds of jogging and two minutes of walking for a total of 20 minutes. Brisk five-minute warm-up walk. Then alternate 90 seconds of jogging and two minutes of walking for a total of 20 minutes. Brisk five-minute warm-up walk. Then alternate 90 seconds of jogging and two minutes of walking for a total of 20 minutes.

3

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then do two repetitions of the following:

  • Jog 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Walk 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 400 yards (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 400 yards (or three minutes)
Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then do two repetitions of the following:

  • Jog 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Walk 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 400 yards (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 400 yards (or three minutes)
Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then do two repetitions of the following:

  • Jog 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Walk 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 400 yards (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 400 yards (or three minutes)

4

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then:

  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 2-1/2 minutes)
  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then:

  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 2-1/2 minutes)
  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then:

  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 2-1/2 minutes)
  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)

5

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then:

  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then:

  • Jog 3/4 mile (or 8 minutes)
  • Walk 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Jog 3/4 mile (or 8 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, and then jog two miles (or 20 minutes) with no walking.

6

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then:

  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 3/4 mile (or 8 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then:

  • Jog 1 mile (or 10 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1 mile (or 10 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 2-1/4 miles (or 25 minutes) with no walking.

7

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 2.5 miles (or 25 minutes). Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 2.5 miles (or 25 minutes). Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 2.5 miles (or 25 minutes).

8

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 2.75 miles (or 28 minutes). Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 2.75 miles (or 28 minutes). Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 2.75 miles (or 28 minutes).

9

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 3 miles (or 30 minutes). Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 3 miles (or 30 minutes). The final workout! Congratulations! Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 3 miles (or 30 minutes).